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Legg v. Spring Grove Hospital

United States District Court, D. Maryland

May 19, 2017

WILLIAM ALLEN LEGG Plaintiff
v.
SPRING GROVE HOSPITAL SUPERINTENDENT CHERYL HIELMAN ATTORNEY GENERAL BRIAN FROSH THE STATE OF MARYLAND Defendants

          MEMORANDUM OPINION

          DEBORAH K. CHASANOW United States District Judge.

         Plaintiff William Allen Legg was charged with second-degree assault on a correctional employee occurring July 27, 2006. His competency was challenged and he was placed at Spring Grove Hospital Center (“SGHC”)[1] per judicial order.[2] On August 8, 2016, Legg filed this civil rights action seeking money damages and immediate release from SGHC, stating he has been forcibly medicated and repeatedly returned to the facility without cause. ECF No. 1 at p. 3.

         Defendants have filed an unopposed motion to dismiss or, in the alternative, for summary judgment.[3] ECF No. 5. Because the court will consider exhibits outside of the pleadings to determine the outcome of this case, [4] the motion will be treated as one for summary judgment under Rule 56. No hearing is needed to resolve the pending motion. See Local Rule 105.6 (D. Md. 2016).

         Standard of Review

         Summary judgment is governed by Fed.R.Civ.P. 56(a), which provides, in part: “The court shall grant summary judgment if the movant shows that there is no genuine dispute as to any material fact and the movant is entitled to judgment as a matter of law.” The Supreme Court has clarified that this does not mean that any factual dispute will defeat the motion: “By its very terms, this standard provides that the mere existence of some alleged factual dispute between the parties will not defeat an otherwise properly supported motion for summary judgment; the requirement is that there be no genuine issue of material fact.” Anderson v. Liberty Lobby, Inc., 477 U.S. 242, 247-48 (1986) (emphasis in original).

         “The party opposing a properly supported motion for summary judgment ‘may not rest upon the mere allegations or denials of [his] pleadings, ' but rather must ‘set forth specific facts showing that there is a genuine issue for trial.” Bouchat v. Baltimore Ravens Football Club, Inc., 346 F.3d 514, 525 (4th Cir. 2003) (alteration in original) (quoting Fed.R.Civ.P. 56(e)), cert. denied, 541 U.S. 1042 (2004). The court should “view the evidence in the light most favorable to . . . the nonmovant, and draw all inferences in her favor without weighing the evidence or assessing the witness' credibility.” Dennis v. Columbia Colleton Med. Ctr., Inc., 290 F.3d 639, 644-45 (4th Cir. 2002); see FDIC v. Cashion, 720 F.3d 169, 173 (4th Cir. 2013).

         The district court's “function” is not “to weigh the evidence and determine the truth of the matter but to determine whether there is a genuine issue for trial.” Anderson, 477 U.S. at 249. Moreover, the trial court may not make credibility determinations on summary judgment. Jacobs v. N.C. Administrative Office of the Courts, 780 F.3d 562, 569 (4th Cir. 2015); Mercantile Peninsula Bank v. French, 499 F.3d 345, 352 (4th Cir. 2007); Black &. Decker Corp. v. United States, 436 F.3d 431, 442 (4th Cir. 2006); Dennis, 290 F.3d at 644-45. Therefore, in the face of conflicting evidence, such as competing affidavits, summary judgment is generally not appropriate, because it is the function of the fact-finder to resolve factual disputes, including matters of witness credibility.

         Nevertheless, to defeat summary judgment, conflicting evidence, if any, must give rise to a genuine dispute of material fact. See Anderson, 477 U.S. at 247-48. If “the evidence is such that a reasonable jury could return a verdict for the nonmoving party, ” then a dispute of material fact precludes summary judgment. Id. at 248; see Libertarian Party of Va. v. Judd, 718 F.3d 308, 313 (4th Cir. 2013). On the other hand, summary judgment is appropriate if the evidence “is so one-sided that one party must prevail as a matter of law.” Id. at 252. And, “the mere existence of a scintilla of evidence in support of the plaintiff's position will be insufficient; there must be evidence on which the jury could reasonably find for the plaintiff.” Id.

         Because Legg is self-represented, his submissions are liberally construed. See Erickson v. Pardus, 551 U.S. 89, 94 (2007). But, the court must also abide by the “affirmative obligation of the trial judge to prevent factually unsupported claims and defenses from proceeding to trial.” Bouchat, 346 F.3d at 526 (internal quotation marks omitted) (quoting Drewitt v. Pratt, 999 F.2d 774, 778-79 (4th Cir. 1993), and citing Celotex Corporation v. Catrett, 477 U.S. 317, 323-24 (1986)).

         Discussion

         A. Competency to Sue

         Before the court can examine the issues in this case, the question of Legg's current mental competency must first be examined.[5] By Defendants' own admission, Legg has previously been found not competent to stand trial and has been involuntarily committed. ECF Nos. 5-2, 5-3.[6] His current mental health status is not apparent based on the parties' submissions.

         Fed. R. Civ. P. 17(c)(2) states:

A minor or an incompetent person who does not have a duly appointed representative may sue by a next friend or by a guardian ad litem. The court must appoint a guardian ad litem-or issue another appropriate order-to protect a minor ...

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